Chores,Time and Money

Time, they say, is a priceless commodity and yet it has its price and, above all, its value. We adults know this, as we are usually paid according to our working hours.

But how exactly do we communicate to children what THEIR time is worth to US? How do we “pay” for the time our children take to do tasks that we adults would otherwise have to do? How do we let them participate in giving us time as parents when they take out the rubbish, walk the dog or wash the dishes? And how do we want to invest this “won” time, as individuals and as a family?

Together against the time robbers

We should all be on our guard against the grey gentlemen of the time savings bank, who offer us interest for saving our time and thus ultimately rob us of time – for the beautiful things in life.

On the other hand, not all the time robbers wear grey suits and smoke fat cigars. Rather, many nasty Time Bandits disguise themselves in everyday costumes: laundry, dishes, hoover, walking the dog, cat’s litter box.

To become master and lady to these time bandits, we parents need allies. And surely they can be found just around the corner in the children’s room. But what “tribute” should we offer our allies so that they take up the fight against the sneaky time robbers at our side?

Time, money, value

First, as parents, we should be clear about one thing: Our children’s time and efforts are not freely available to us, nor should they be scheduled as a matter of course or taken as free. This is true even if we, as adults, are not paid for the work we do around the house.

So if we give our children money for doing the:

  • do the dishes
  • walk the dog
  • putting the washing in the cupboard
  • watering the plants and flowers in the garden
  • vacuuming

We give you two things at once:

  • we appreciate your time and effort.
  • work is rewarded – also work in the household/at home

In addition, as parents we have access to several levels at the same time, where time, money and effort are combined:

  • more complex, more time-consuming tasks are paid correspondingly higher.
  • poorly done work is only paid for when it has been done according to the agreement.
  • good and very good work is paid accordingly.
  • regular help in the household means regular working hours and effort, but also regular payment, i.e. the ability to plan (free) time and money.

More complex, more time-consuming tasks are paid correspondingly higher.

  • poorly done work is only paid for when it has been done according to the agreement.
  • good and very good work is paid accordingly.
  • regular help in the household means regular working hours and effort, but also regular payment, i.e. the ability to plan (free) time and money.

With the Finny Kids App, chores can not only be planned easily and in detail, but also pay off in two ways.

  • the ability to plan: try something new or fall back on the tried and tested – both are possible with the Finny app when it comes to chores. Children can add a completely new task as well as fall back on existing and/or predefined ones. When choosing pre-set tasks, they can even select those that are particularly suitable for even younger children or for a specific season. Thanks to the practical overview, the children can always see which tasks they have completed and how much money they have received for them.
  • Whatever they choose, one thing always remains the same: the simple setting of the regularity with which the chosen task(s) is (are) to be completed, i.e:
    • once
    • daily
    • weekly (and on which day of the week exactly)

Also, when choosing a task, your child can specify what reward he/she wants for it. Finally, transparency in matters of (pocket) money is the best basis so that everyone is always on the same level.

  • Leaderboard and points:With the help of the practical Auto-Approve button, your child can decide for themselves when you as parents should assess their work, i.e. in one, two or even three hours. The “photo evidence” of the work done can also be selected or activated. Then it is “screen free” for you as parents. You receive a notification about the task and whether it has been completed, in the best case with photo evidence. Now you can decide (purely objectively, of course) how your child has done:
    • If you see a need for “optimisation” here and there (for example, a dust lint or two under the desk), your sunshine will have to do the finishing touches again.
    • Once you are satisfied, you can continue with points and the bonus. By rating your child with up to five stars, you help them climb the leaderboard. In addition, you can reward your child with the amount they want (or more or less).

So, to summarise:

  1. Rewarding chores creates understanding of the value of time, effort and work. Therefore, the amounts paid should also be appropriate, i.e. matched to the “degree of difficulty”, duration and complexity of the task.
  2. Not all tasks are the same. For example, it makes sense to link house or garden chores to the age of the child and also to the season. Of course, older children can, for example, clear small areas/paths or mum’s/dad’s car of snow, water the plants and flowers in the garden in the summer, etc. The main thing is that the task is really a chore. The main thing is that the task is really doable and that child-friendly “work tools” are available, i.e. smaller watering cans or snow shovels.
  3. Transparency and consistency are king and queen: Everyone must be able to understand what has been agreed upon. Which task should be completed by when, in what “quality” and frequency, and for what reward? If your child does not stick to it, he or she should be given the chance to try again.
  4. Not only money counts: Especially when the value of money is not yet so clear to your child, other rewards such as Finny Leaderboard points can be an additional motivation and reward.

In short: The more structured chores are planned and rewarded and the more comprehensible and individual agreements and associated rewards and also consequences are, the easier it is for your child to understand what his or her time and work are worth.

Try Finny Apps now